Author Topic: Help for people buying the "12-48 Volt 1800/2500 Watt ZVS induction Heater"  (Read 17411 times)

Offline hightemp1

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Hiya hightemp.  I did the isolation mod on all 3 of my PS's and got over 36v.  I tried leaving 1 of them un-modded as suggested elsewhere but it wouldn't work.

As far as how well they work under load for long periods, I can't say yet as my IH project had to be put on hold due to some paying machining work.  I did run a 36VDC motor with it for an hour or so & it worked fine. 
I hope to finish up the project soon.  I can't wait to see it work! :)

DICKEYBIRD, I read as you did that leaving one of the PSs grounded is best - like you I don't know alot about electronics and really don't understand why this method is better (other than supposedly it leaves you with floating DC ground intact on all of them and is safer for both equipment and humans).  Hydron has stated that putting the grounded PS towards the middle of a series connection may offer extra safety by lowering the float voltage apparently - I may try putting the grounded one in position 2 or 3,  but would prefer some expert advice beforehand?

The reason I ask which model you have is because another forum (an RC battery website) says Model pl-18 supposedly can be DC grounded, but PD-18 can not be (it will work for a while but eventually shorts itself out).  I have the pd-18 model and may have figured out how to ground it, but don't know a surefire test for a DC float series connection with one unit un-grounded.  Any advice from engineers or the likes much appreciated.

Tests Done so far:  All three adapted supplies individually test like they are DC isolated with multimeter (0 volts when case is probed to DC rail).  Also individually, each one powers a 12 volt car headlamp equally well.  When all 4 are put in series, in the order MADs advises, then I get 48 volts.  A Series DC ground test shows 53 volts on any of the rails to any of the cases (does not mater if all cases physically touch each other or none of them touch - still get 53 volts).  Am I correctly floating DC ground?
« Last Edit: July 19, 2019, 02:52:15 PM by hightemp1 »

Offline DICKEYBIRD

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I just checked & I have the-PD18's as well.  I sure hope they keep on working.  I tried one un-modded PS in several different locations in the series but nothing worked so I modded the 3rd one & all seems to work well with no voltage fluctuations, beeps, etc.  I think the motor I ran in the test pulled maybe 6A or so & the PS fans speeded up somewhat a couple times.  I can't answer your DC floating questions because I'm definitely not electrically knowledgeable...just a 71 year old auto dealer service guy & self-trained weekend machinist/tinkerer that surfs the web & youtube for electrical help.  Maybe somebody here can enlighten us?
Milton from Tennessee ya'll

Offline hightemp1

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I just checked & I have the-PD18's as well.  I sure hope they keep on working.  I tried one un-modded PS in several different locations in the series but nothing worked so I modded the 3rd one & all seems to work well with no voltage fluctuations, beeps, etc.  I think the motor I ran in the test pulled maybe 6A or so & the PS fans speeded up somewhat a couple times.  I can't answer your DC floating questions because I'm definitely not electrically knowledgeable...just a 71 year old auto dealer service guy & self-trained weekend machinist/tinkerer that surfs the web & youtube for electrical help.  Maybe somebody here can enlighten us?

DICKEYBIRD, you can test to see if each PS is DC isolated, I think?  What I did was separated them completely, turned one on and check volts between positive rail and case - it should read zero.  Mine, after initial MOD, all read between 6 and 9 volts, if I recall correctly.  After isolating an extra daughterboard ground screw within the case, and the additional back DC ground screw to the case, then I got 0 volts on each one.   

Here is the link I was referencing:

https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?3137941-Converted-DPS-750-PSU-info_dump

Yes, we definitely need some enlightening.   MADS 15 minute burn test may have been insufficient,  and maybe during your test, the fans speeding up should not have occurred if motor load was constant?  I think MADS said in his video that the fans flucuated also but said they were the fans on the ZVS unit and that was normal.  Though he did say the PS cases were quite warm to the touch and water temps rose quite a bit but figured those high case temps were normal because the PSs were so densely power packed.

Also wondering,  when you say 'nothing worked when you left one PS grounded to DC in any series orientation', do you mean that you got zero volts out of all of them while in series, or that it would not power the motor properly, or did you mean something else?
« Last Edit: July 19, 2019, 04:42:43 AM by hightemp1 »

Offline Bert911

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Hi to everyone,
My intension to use the original 2000W ZVS circuit with other Mosfets/IGBTs wasn't a success.
Furthermore, due to the non optimized control for the IGBT the new ones died again after around 30s of solid working with no obvious reason, no ringing at the gate or so. The build in fail-safe, which should open the relay in case of an over current, didn't work and the relay welded itself to a permanent on position.

After that I salvaged the few remaining parts.
I'm now going to use the circuit from Jörg Rehrmann.
I will have LESS fail-safe options, but these can handle the current and voltages regardless of the case.
It's basically just a mains fuse at the DC side, which won't like the DC, but it's cheap and will do the business and a large primary contactor, which is manually controlled. So I can decide, when it's too much current.
With my analogue ammeter I can assume the used power.

http://www.joretronik.de/Oszillatoren/Oszillatoren.html
Last one on the site. I'll keep the 18V control-voltage always on and switch the primary voltage, so the IGBT's won't come in strange half open states.
According to the designer, this circuit should always oscillate.

The Chinese board always switched off randomly even at 75% Voltage/current, that was a pain, it randomly said over current/voltage/temp....

So my inertia question:
Is the circuit capable for higher power level --> I wouldn't recommend it for more than 1,5kW.

Offline petespaco

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Work Coil Lead Extension:
Short video on Swaging Copper Tubing is here:
/>
  Sometimes, when making a work coil, I don't make the leads long enough and have to add several inches to one or both ends.  Sometimes it's just laziness. I often don't premeasure the stock.  I just start with the  remainder of the tubing roll that I got from the hardware store and then cut the new work coil off that roll when I'm done.
  So sometimes I need to make minor adjustments to the length of coil leads to get them going in the right direction.  One way to deal with lengthening leads is to simply buy brass unions, with either flare or compression fittings.  Of course they cost several dollars each.  One could also use copper sweat tube unions, but they are hard to find for small tubing.  I even tried finding some 5/16" tubing to use for a union, with no success, even at a big box store!
---And, I have to go to the store to get them when I need them.
  So, in looking for alternatives, I found a few videos of guys swaging the end of the tube with any one of various tools.  The swage simply opens up the end of one tube so the other tube slides inside by about  1/4" and then you soft solder the joint.
  Well, I liked that idea but didn't want to spend anywhere from USD$ 20 to well over USD$ 100 to buy a swage or a swaging set.  So I made my own, just for the 1/4" tubing size that I usually use.

Pete Stanaitis
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Offline hightemp1

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Pushing the limits with a small work coil for annealing brass cartridges.  For this video, I make and use the smallest diameter work coil yet for the 1000 watt ZVS induction heater.   Although I focus on annealing a brass cartridge casing very quickly, this video is really a next step in my ongoing series about work coil design and  work coil frequency limits for reliable circuit operation.

Pete, I love your videos, you really get deep into the topics, do a lot of experiments and share your results. Kudos to you Sir.

You video editing was also really good in this video, keep up the good work, it had a nice flow and I enjoyed it from start to end!

Mads, I agree completely. 
Peter, all of your videos are very thoughtful and helpful.
« Last Edit: July 22, 2019, 12:02:07 AM by hightemp1 »

Offline petespaco

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Testing a large "Pancake" work coil.
   I just uploaded the test of my latest work coil.  It's a 10 inch diameter spiral or "pancake" coil.
It is here:
/>  There are lessons to be learned in this video, but I didn't find this coil to be as useful an everyday tool as I thought it might be.
I hope some of you  have some questions or ideas about this test.
At this point I think I have found the approximate range of frequencies that this 1000 watt heater can work successfully at.

Pete Stanaitis
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Offline hightemp1

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Wondering if a two dimensional coil would be any better.  And, for non-magnetic and/or thinner sheet metals, possibly wrapping work-piece around the outside or inside of cylinder shapes made of iron, graphite or high resistant silicon.  Also wondering if even heating of sheet metal would not be more suited to resistant ovens with fine temperature controls, and of course the use of simple propane or gas/ox torches that are commonly used.  But, induction heating is highly versatile, adaptable and efficient with correctly shaped coils so I would think heat treating would somehow work just fine.  Peter, try using it to boil corn or maybe a fish boil  ;)
« Last Edit: August 04, 2019, 01:30:44 AM by hightemp1 »

Offline T3sl4co1l

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Probably just that the impedance is so high, from the high inductance.  Same overall dimensions but fewer turns, should be back with normal power levels I would think.

Peter, try using it to boil corn or maybe a fish boil  ;)

Back when I was working at an induction company, there were at least several lunches I ran on the machine in the proto lab.  Seems that a can of Chef Boyardee can't take much more than a kilowatt, two even with stirring, and so the heat time is about two minutes.  Just as you'd do with a bowl of the stuff in a microwave oven, oddly enough. ;D

Tim
« Last Edit: August 04, 2019, 11:55:34 AM by T3sl4co1l »

Offline petespaco

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Quote
Probably just that the impedance is so high, from the high inductance.  Same overall dimensions but fewer turns, should be back with normal power levels I would think.
Regarding "should be back with normal power levels":
   For this 1000 watt heater, 22 amps at 48 volts IS the "normal" max. power level.

Regarding cooking with it:
   I think I'd rather buy an Ikea HOB (Hotplate Or Burner, as the English say) for USD$ 88.00.  It is clear the we CAN heat the bottom of a ferrous pan pretty well.

I will probably run this coil on the 2500 watt unit one of these days to see if and how the results differ.

Pete Stanaitis
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Offline petespaco

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Okay---  Here is the result of attaching the 10 inch OD "Pancake" work coil to the 2500 Watt ZVS Induction Heater and testing it:
/>
Pete Stanaitis
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Offline Bert911

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Hi everyone,

Last week I finished my own ZSV heater circuit.
After some many cooling problems and my first self made water coolers it worked great.
The circuit from Jörg Rehrmann works fantastic with no issues.
The capacitor from Eectech has 4.0µF 400Vrsm 700Arms and don't get that warm.
For cooling I have two of the Chinese water pumps in parallel, of course watercooled (they get really hot after some time) with a 30 litre canister.
With pancake coils the circulated water is around 30 °C warmer than the supply water.
With my nice case I can touch most of the heater without shocking my self.
I confirmed 5kW at 50A and 100V at the input. The water cooled IGBT are getting up to 80°C at 50 A, that's OK, not great but solid.
I plan to make some more professional water coolers and upgrade the pumps, the cooler the system runs, the more efficient it gets.

For me the 650V IGBT are more than enough and it was the right decision to not use the not so suitable 1200V IGBT.
The stainless steel is glowing at 1150 °C and was melting from behind.  :o
« Last Edit: August 14, 2019, 03:45:52 PM by Bert911 »

Offline petespaco

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For Bert911---
  Good that you have your induction heater running now.
What applications for this induction heater do you have in mind?
Can you tell us the frequency of operation and inductance of that pancake work coil?

Pete Stanaitis
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Offline Lane

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Nice to find this place. I've been playing with induction on and off for a while; but just now trying to wrap my head around this beast. I thought it was strange at first that only 5% of the power was going in to melt a non-ferris metal; but then I ran the numbers of specific heat of graphite...

Then we can talk about mass of graphite, position in/around the coil, size, volume, exposed area, coupled volume, etc... I'm not at all shocked someone was able to melt a few kg with 1000W in an hour with good insulation. I've recently found some good references on painting a ceramic coating on (by yourself) to standard graphite crucibles though; that should help a lot to avoid oxidation. Heating for a full hour might require a different coil setup, loading method, etc.

I was curious about why bronze casting might be bad with induction... I presume melting copper first and then adding bronze would work just fine. Just might not be able to load the crucible full of scrap bronze up front?

I've got a lot to read; and a lot to learn, but sounds like a few of you have it under control here to some extent. My early experiments proved about 20 Wh consistently heated a 20mm crucible to copper melting temperate. Even as the crucible degraded (and current dropped); the 20 Wh metric was still sound. Look forward to comparing numbers on larger metal pours with you all. Hey Pete (you specifically know I'm not melting copper metal)!

Offline rikkitikkitavi

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Hi everyone,

Last week I finished my own ZSV heater circuit.
After some many cooling problems and my first self made water coolers it worked great.
The circuit from Jörg Rehrmann works fantastic with no issues.
The capacitor from Eectech has 4.0µF 400Vrsm 700Arms and don't get that warm.
For cooling I have two of the Chinese water pumps in parallel, of course watercooled (they get really hot after some time) with a 30 litre canister.
With pancake coils the circulated water is around 30 °C warmer than the supply water.
With my nice case I can touch most of the heater without shocking my self.
I confirmed 5kW at 50A and 100V at the input. The water cooled IGBT are getting up to 80°C at 50 A, that's OK, not great but solid.
I plan to make some more professional water coolers and upgrade the pumps, the cooler the system runs, the more efficient it gets.

For me the 650V IGBT are more than enough and it was the right decision to not use the not so suitable 1200V IGBT.
The stainless steel is glowing at 1150 °C and was melting from behind.  :o
Good to hear that it is working nicely.

I have looked at the schematic, since Rehmann has it protected I assume it is quite good. Would you mind showing us yours, ie with parts?

You use a separate power supply of 18V (always on) instead of the R1,ZD1/C1 net? And 100VDC feed of course?

I guess the schematic lends itself to an LTSpice simulation or two...

I have a bunch of 48V server supplies, some NOS (2000W) and some legendary ESP120 (used) that I was thinking of series connection two for 100VDC (well 102,8 V nominally...) . I was just wondering how to protect them, I assume distance (ie cables, inductive decoupling by series inductances, over voltage protection (fast) )
A man can not have to many variacs

Offline Lane

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Just before my first near-catastrophic failure. There was a bright light in the wiring of the induction coil feed cable. Should have known better with those fat copper tails hanging around on top of the bad connection. Fact is; I am not sure what to use for a PCB connector with this type of 8 ga. stranded wire. This wired setup does help to isolate the coil/work heat from the PCB. Unfortunately those hookup parts that came with this 1000W unit were always junk.

Been running this for quite some time... At 24v briefly, then 48v; with a factory new chopped off 20mm (height) x 40mm (diameter) dense graphite crucible floating in the coil; it can draw in excess of 18A at 48v. As the crucible degrades it drops down as low as 10A. Still getting little more than 20Wh consumption when heating the larger crucible to melting temperature (though it's quite short and small in volume).

Tough to see; but the HAZ on those copper strands is widely varied. Some of them were glowing red hot after a very short heating session. I had to cut it off at 7Wh when I smelled burning. Time to refactor; not sad that I got a lot of milage out of this already (7,500 Wh and more than a dozen 20-40mm diameter crucibles).

Offline petespaco

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Those standoffs on the PCB have worked okay for me for quite some time, but I do use 1/4" OD copper tubing coils to connect to them and  I water cool the tubing.

Pete Stanaitis
---------------

Offline Lane

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Thanks Pete. I looked at the 1,000W unit more closely with a clear head. There was a good amount of heat introduced to the end of the wire due to a poor quality connection where the wire met the standoffs. I cut off the end of the wire and checked the screws into the PCB (all still tight). Put everything back together, and it pulled 14A again with a very degraded (empty) crucible. So I'm back in production with the 1,000W unit.

On the other hand; I have a 3,500W unit showing up in the mail tomorrow. I don't know all that much about it at the moment. It was $35 though; so I figured it was worth an experiment or two. Even if I only use it for simple tasks it's a good deal at that price. I was able to find a very similar model that had a schematic in the manual. There appear to be some very minor differences between the schematic and this board; like the prescribed inductance of the work coil. The microcontroller appears to be socketed; so it might not be too difficult to start fresh with customized software down the road. In the mean time; I would be happy to have some level of power control and a timer. Definitely planning to use coils that aren't pancake shaped for these experiments. Looked over your work coil spreadsheet Pete, and it appears I may want to add capacitors to this unit? Hitting the specified 120µH coil inductance (20-30kHz operating freq.) might be hard going by the data you've published.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07M64PGH3

Also have a 48V 2,500W unit a few days out; but don't have any serious plans for that extra power yet. I simply need another unit online so I can allow one to be cooling while I continue with other hot work.

Offline Lane

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Earlier Self quote: pulled 14A again with a very degraded (empty) crucible. So I'm back in production with the 1,000W unit.

Figured I would post a bit more technical detail while I'm thinking about it; and can test things again. Here is a look at my collection of new and degraded crucibles. I get at least 20 full heating cycles (>2,000F) out of graphite crucible with a ceramic fiber insulation mostly insulating things (seems like the more the better). Those heats take between 1.5 minutes and 3 minutes depending on how used the crucible is. I can get closer to 50 total heating/cooling cycles (before the crucible turns to dust) if those are split between full melt temperature and lower temperature annealing cycles. I've read that a paint on ceramic coating might help prolong the life of off the shelf pure graphite crucibles.

The 2 oz. crucibles are on the right; and a selection of cut 40mm (largest), 6 oz. and 3 oz. on the left. Due to wall thickness and density differences; the cut 40mm, cut 6 oz. and uncut 3 oz. all weigh between 25-30 grams; while the 2 oz. is only 13.5 grams (when new).

This particular setup draws around 19A with a 30 gram graphite crucible partially inside a 3 three turn 2 layer 45mm I.D. coil. I could likely draw more current if I fully submerged the crucible; but I'm already near the upper limit of a 1,000W unit; so I tune current draw by moving the crucible up and down. I have tried an uncut 40mm x 40mm crucible at 44 grams; and it draws far too much current this way.

While these are small; the whole range of crucibles all used 20Wh of energy to hit the >2,000F metric. It's a bit less than 20Wh with a warm graphite crucible; and can be a hair more with a larger load of metal. While the lighter 13.5 gram 2 oz. crucible draws less current; it still required 20Wh to hit melting temperature. Clearly data isn't going to hold up with larger melts; but it's a starting point in terms of my observations this far. I rarely go over an ounce in terms of metal weight with this setup; so that is very much negligible in terms of heating power/time for me.

I'm curious to see what I can do with kilogram sized crucibles; but a quick check indicates that a 1kg crucibles weights 140-160 grams, 2kg 240-330? grams, 3kg 340-360 grams, 4kg 447 grams, 5 kg 690 grams. Those were the best ranges I could find in terms of weights from product listings at least...

Unfortunately I can't tell what frequency my current furnace is operating at; or what my coil inductance is. The LC100 meter I bought years ago arrived broken (displays an error when attempting to measure low range inductance). Waiting on a replacement to show up now that I actually need one. Still need to build a frequency counter display when I get around to it as well.

Obviously Pete's work has helped me a quite a bit in getting this far; thank you very much (again) for all that. I'll try to condense some of data collection to post up as I have time. Here is a quick look at a melt cycle for 2.900 grams of non-ferrous (group 11). Took only 15Wh, and 1:35 seconds even in a heavily degraded crucible. That old wiring might have hobbled some of my early data (too much energy usage for same work); but even so, breaking 2,000F in 1 min 30 seconds is totally decent either way in my opinion. Here is a look at the meter pre-melt (from cold temp), cold furnace; first start wattage/current, then furnace color and final Wh count.
« Last Edit: August 17, 2019, 10:55:19 AM by Lane »

Offline Bert911

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So many posts  :D

What applications for this induction heater do you have in mind?
Can you tell us the frequency of operation and inductance of that pancake work coil?

For now, I'm using an induction heater for my diploma thesis, later I want to use it for metal working, losing screws, heat treating and cleaning. Heat works like a charm for removing grease or paint, no chemicals needed.
This coil runs at 86 kHz with 0,86 µH of inductance.
From my tests for pancake coils I noticed a drastic increase of loss in the inner winding the smaller the inner diameter gets.
I wouldn't recommend smaller than 25mm, better higher.

I've recently found some good references on painting a ceramic coating on (by yourself) to
standard graphite crucibles though; that should help a lot to avoid oxidation. Heating for
a full hour might require a different coil setup, loading method, etc.

I used some coating for stainless steel containers to protect it from the aluminium:
3M Boron Nitride Suspension WP

http://technical-ceramics.3mdeutschland.de/fileadmin/content/download/produktinformation-EN/PI_boron_nitride_suspension_wp_e.pdf

The coating works great but is very sensitive to mechanical scratches, but there it's undamaged it's doing a great job of protecting the steel.
At the damaged area, the 12 mm thick steel was eaten away during 4 hours!

I have looked at the schematic, since Rehmann has it protected I assume it is quite good.
Would you mind showing us yours, ie with parts?
You use a separate power supply of 18V (always on) instead of the R1,ZD1/C1 net? And
100VDC feed of course?
I guess the schematic lends itself to an LTSpice simulation or two...
I have a bunch of 48V server supplies, some NOS (2000W) and some legendary ESP120 (used)
that I was thinking of series connection two for 100VDC (well 102,8 V nominally...) . I
was just wondering how to protect them, I assume distance (ie cables, inductive decoupling
by series inductances, over voltage protection (fast) )

LTSpice isn't that good at simulating IGBTs, I couldn't get it to work and I don't think the simulations are representative anyway, since ringing and non linear inductances may occur.

The boom of this circuit is attached and can be loaded directly into Digikey. I used the MUR1560 diode in the circuit, which is totally over dimensioned, but the size of it bothered me the most.
I would recommend the MUR460 in the circuit and two MUR1560 at the input terminals.
I can't give any recommendations for the inductors since I don't know the value and the one's from Digikey aren't really suitable.

I have some normal reset able house fuses in parallel for some simple current protection, but if they switch, there could be a huge voltage spike, which should be covered with the MUR1560 Diode at the input.
I used a 12V power supply for the fan and the cheapest dc-dc converter from ebay to generate 20V, which is then reduced to 18V, not that necessary, but won't hurt anyway.

https://www.ebay.de/itm/3x-XL6009-DC-DC-Boost-Modul-Step-Up-LM2577-Schaltregler-Konverter-Arduino/252796314014?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2649

The fan and the control voltage is always on, it is safer to apply the control voltage before the main voltage for a safe oscillation.
I like to slowly increase the supply voltage to see how the current rises.
I also use a power relay to switch the transformers on and off but I have done this just up to 30A to reduce the inrush currents.
You could simply switch the supplies on and off.

Next week I can make some close-ups from the circuit.
Since the circuit components aren-t that expensive I will build a new version with 4 IGBT'S (two in parallel) with some better hose management.

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[Transformer (iron core)]
rustedone
October 18, 2019, 05:35:02 PM
post Re: making a useable induction forge.
[Transformer (iron core)]
T3sl4co1l
October 18, 2019, 04:29:03 PM
post Re: making a useable induction forge.
[Transformer (iron core)]
rustedone
October 18, 2019, 02:09:23 PM
post Re: making a useable induction forge.
[Transformer (iron core)]
rustedone
October 18, 2019, 09:00:52 AM
post Re: making a useable induction forge.
[Transformer (iron core)]
T3sl4co1l
October 18, 2019, 08:05:06 AM
post Re: Problems with my first DRSSTC
[Dual Resonant Solid State Tesla coils]
davekni
October 18, 2019, 06:30:06 AM
post Re: so far video
[Spark gap Tesla coils]
thedoc298
October 18, 2019, 04:42:52 AM
post QCW Capacitor Torture Testing
[Dual Resonant Solid State Tesla coils]
Weston
October 18, 2019, 02:41:44 AM
post Re: Problems with my first DRSSTC
[Dual Resonant Solid State Tesla coils]
bozidar
October 17, 2019, 05:53:09 PM
post Re: making a useable induction forge.
[Transformer (iron core)]
rustedone
October 17, 2019, 05:09:29 PM
post Re: making a useable induction forge.
[Transformer (iron core)]
rustedone
October 17, 2019, 04:04:53 PM
post Re: making a useable induction forge.
[Transformer (iron core)]
T3sl4co1l
October 17, 2019, 11:30:19 AM
post Re: making a useable induction forge.
[Transformer (iron core)]
rustedone
October 17, 2019, 10:59:31 AM
post Re: making a useable induction forge.
[Transformer (iron core)]
Bert911
October 17, 2019, 10:02:12 AM
post Re: making a useable induction forge.
[Transformer (iron core)]
rustedone
October 17, 2019, 08:19:19 AM
post Re: making a useable induction forge.
[Transformer (iron core)]
Bert911
October 17, 2019, 07:57:58 AM
post Re: making a useable induction forge.
[Transformer (iron core)]
T3sl4co1l
October 17, 2019, 06:19:14 AM
post Re: making a useable induction forge.
[Transformer (iron core)]
T3sl4co1l
October 17, 2019, 05:45:36 AM
post Re: DRSSTC with litz-wire primary and 40 x TO247 IGBT H-Bridge
[Dual Resonant Solid State Tesla coils]
davekni
October 17, 2019, 03:22:22 AM
post Re: making a useable induction forge.
[Transformer (iron core)]
davekni
October 17, 2019, 03:08:49 AM
post Re: Mysterious Chinese HV capacitors
[Capacitor banks]
Experimentonomen
October 16, 2019, 08:41:05 PM
post Re: Mysterious Chinese HV capacitors
[Capacitor banks]
ElectroXa
October 16, 2019, 08:35:30 PM
post Re: making a useable induction forge.
[Transformer (iron core)]
rustedone
October 16, 2019, 05:49:02 PM
post Re: Analog Panel Meter Shunt Calculation and Custom Scale Design
[Beginners]
klugesmith
October 16, 2019, 05:36:46 PM
post Re: making a useable induction forge.
[Transformer (iron core)]
T3sl4co1l
October 16, 2019, 05:07:22 PM
post making a useable induction forge.
[Transformer (iron core)]
rustedone
October 16, 2019, 04:20:15 PM
post Re: 220ac to 440dc 5a boost convertor
[Voltage Multipliers]
rustedone
October 16, 2019, 04:03:58 PM
post Analog Panel Meter Shunt Calculation and Custom Scale Design
[Beginners]
Mads Barnkob
October 16, 2019, 07:56:20 AM
post Re: Mysterious Chinese HV capacitors
[Capacitor banks]
MRMILSTAR
October 16, 2019, 05:40:55 AM
post Re: Mysterious Chinese HV capacitors
[Capacitor banks]
davekni
October 16, 2019, 03:33:52 AM
post WTS [US]: pole transformer, SRSG, PTs, NSTs, capacitors, variacs, [MORE]
[Sell / Buy / Trade]
acobaugh
October 15, 2019, 09:36:55 PM
post Mysterious Chinese HV capacitors
[Capacitor banks]
MRMILSTAR
October 15, 2019, 09:12:09 PM
post Re: DRSSTC with litz-wire primary and 40 x TO247 IGBT H-Bridge
[Dual Resonant Solid State Tesla coils]
Mads Barnkob
October 15, 2019, 12:38:24 PM
post Re: How to measure voltage output of AC flyback transformer
[Transformer (ferrite core)]
davekni
October 14, 2019, 10:02:07 PM
post Re: DRSSTC with litz-wire primary and 40 x TO247 IGBT H-Bridge
[Dual Resonant Solid State Tesla coils]
Weston
October 14, 2019, 08:46:54 PM
post Re: How to measure voltage output of AC flyback transformer
[Transformer (ferrite core)]
MRMILSTAR
October 14, 2019, 08:28:19 PM

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